A LOOK AT MORALITY AND SUPERMORALITY - part 1

A LOOK AT MORALITY AND SUPERMORALITY - part 1

written by: DENISE MCDERMOTT KING
by: DENISE MCDERMOTT KING

In this article I wish to present a connection between morality and conventionality and then look more closely at Super-morality. Morality is a brain function, and Super-morality comes from the heart.

The former is dependant on rules and conventions, the latter entirely dependant on the circumstances. I will repeat this; as to me this is very poignant. The former is dependant on rules and conventions, the latter entirely dependant on the circumstances.

Many conventional types, without questioning, will stick to the morals set forth by those around them, by society, nations and of course the groups they belong to, and these change like the wind from group to group and country to country.

So I ask, what kind of morality is it that changes to suit men's needs?

Of course, in these cases it is usually fear that motivates, and of course fear is a selfish emotion, for it has self-regard first and little self-less-ness, if any. This fear is usually around what others may think, can be based on vanity, or even the fear of being hurt.

Conventionalists rarely go against what the majority may think right, for then they may have to deal with the rebuffs of that majority, and for them this could change their worlds considerably.

Another thing to consider is that a person may not be the most popular kid on the block if he/she were to go against the so-called norm, and we see this becoming prevalent in many organizations around the world, whether it be political, religious, medical, in the arts and science, but also in the theosophical movement.

Then we have the man who may be conventionally moral because a certain morality is purely convenient, as it may give him acceptability in some form or another.

To fear being judged by your neighbour is valid, however, this is vanity and cowardice.

As a student of any spiritual discipline, even theosophy, there is an intense personal desire to be kind and spiritually minded towards all. Inspired by this idealistic attitude, it often occurs, that when we see someone making a mistake and they ask our opinion, we may sense we can cause suffering to his/her outer personality or "shell" by telling the truth, we take for granted that such a person is attached to his favourite illusions.

It seems unacceptable for us to destroy any fancies of our friend's outer shell so we attempt to fit in, and as spoken of earlier this is cowardice. Maybe, one or two of our friends do the same favour to us when faced with our questioning.